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Communicating with Your Child's School Through Letter Writing
Communicating with Your Child
A publication of the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
Throughout your child’s
school years, there is always
a need to communicate with
the school’s teachers,
administrators, and others
concerned with your child’s
education. There are also times
when the school needs to communi-
cate with you. This is particularly true when your
child has a disability and is receiving special
education services. Some of this communication is
informal, such as phone calls, comments in your
child’s notebook, a chat when picking your child up
from school or at a school function. Other forms of
communication are more formal and need to be
written down.
Letters provide both you and the school with a
record of ideas, concerns, and suggestions. Putting
your thoughts on paper gives you the opportunity
to take as long as you need to:
state your concerns,
think over what you’ve written,
make changes, and
have someone else read over the letter and make
suggestions.
Letters also give people the opportunity to go
over what’s been suggested or discussed. A lot of
confusion and misunderstanding can be avoided by
writing down thoughts and ideas.
However, writing letters is a skill. Each letter you
write will differ according to the situation, the
person to whom you are writing, and the issues you
are discussing. This Parent’s Guide will help you in
writing to the professionals involved in your child’s
special education.
Communicating with
Your Child’s School
Through
LL
LL
Letter Writing
is the
National Dissemination Center
for Children with Disabilities.
NICHCY
1825 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
1.800.695.0285 (Voice / TTY)
202.884.8200 (Voice / TTY)
nichcy@fhi360.org
http://nichcy.org
A Parent’s Guide
3rd edition, January 2011
Note: The term “parent” is used throughout
this Parent’s Guide to include natural or adop-
tive parents, foster parents, surrogate parents,
legal guardians, or any primary caregiver who
is acting in the role of a parent.
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source: parentcenterhub.org
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